• James Thurman
  • James Thurman
  • James Thurman
  • James Thurman
  • James Thurman
  • James Thurman
  • James Thurman
  • James Thurman
  • James Thurman

James Thurman

Title: Seemingly Sisyphean

Artist: James Thurman

Rarity: Unique

Method: Repurposed London bus panel, waterjet cut, laser etched, hand fabricated

Material: Aluminium, acrylic, copper rivets, 

Size: 31 x 42 x 2.5cm

Weight: 1.01KG

Nationality: American

"Homelessness is a multifaceted failure of society. Because of the complexity of intertwined causations, it can appear to be insurmountable. I chose to use the image of Sisyphus to represent this perception of a challenge without end. I created a necklace so that the piece could become wearable and portable, spreading it's message to anyone who engaged with the piece on its travels.

The focal point of the necklace is an eye. The eye was chosen for several reasons. First, the eye emphasises that we can see the individuals who are trapped in this situation. Second, those of us trying to rectify the situation see those in authority who are not making efforts to improve the situation. Third, the eye can become a talisman (like the Turkish nazar boncuğu) to ward off the evil eye of others. it has been my honour to participate in this project and contribute in the best way I know how, through the making of objects that might help make a difference." - James Thurman

James Thurman is a Professor of Metalsmithing & Jewellery at the University of North Texas’ College of Visual Arts & Design. He received his MFA in Metalsmithing from the Cranbrook Academy of Art and his BFA in Sculpture from Carnegie Mellon University. A two-time Fulbright Specialist Scholar, he worked in Istanbul, Turkey, with Kadir Has University in 2012 and the Glass Furnace Foundation in 2016.

A prolific and highly active studio artist for over twenty-five years, his work has been included in hundreds of national and international curated and juried exhibitions as well as numerous solo exhibitions. In addition to the exhibition of his work, James regularly lectures and gives workshops about his work and the unique technical aspects of his studio production, including a laminated composite material he developed, “Thurmanite.” Previous venues have included The Glass Furnace (Istanbul, Turkey), Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts, Haystack Mountain School of Crafts, Penland School of Crafts, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston Glassell School, Pittsburgh Center for the Arts, and the Yuma Symposium.

Digital fabrication continues to evolve as a major aspect of his research and teaching, ever since completing his Machinist Certification in 1995. Beyond utilisation in his own studio production, he has incorporated digital fabrication into his teaching for more than fifteen years, including a unique online studio-based course since 2012. As Coordinator of the North Texas Digital Fabrication Group, he facilitates regular Group meetings and an annual Symposium.

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